Friday, September 12, 2014

Aargh! number two is here


The second issue of Aargh! is out.

 

Once more Aargh! consists of 16 pages of radical analysis and commentary for only $2. This issue includes  articles about elections, voting and political parties, including:

 


  • 50 Days of Democracy
  • The Green Party
  • Drones - Judge, Jury and Executioner
  • The Neo-Liberal Prescription
 It also has book reviews, a film review and a recipe.

Aargh! is at the Freedom Shop. If you can't make it to the shop, send us an envelope addressed to yourself and with an appropriate stamp and we'll mail you one. Send us ten dollars and we'll send five copies for you to give to your friends and family, who are bound to be delighted.



Monday, August 18, 2014

New Books

We have had a couple of boxes of new books and tee-shirts arrive from AK Press, including:


'Against Equality' critiques the current struggle for inclusion and equality in conservative systems and institutions for all queer people. Instead on inclusion, the Against Equality Collective challenges people to struggle for alternatives to the current system - for radical transformation of society.

The Collective hope to 'reinvigorate the queer political imagination with fantastic possibility!'



We also have a couple of copies of an anthology of Peter Kropotkin's writings: 'Direct Struggle Against Capital'.

Edited by Iain McKay, the book is fully annotated and features an historical introduction, biographical sketch, glossary, bibliography and index.

"The enemy on whom we declare war is capital, and it is against capital that we will direct all our efforts, taking care not to become distracted from our goal by the phony campaigns and arguments of the political parties. The great struggle that we are preparing for is essentially economic, and so it is on the economic terrain that we should focus our activities." —Peter Kropotkin

  Another anthology we have is an Errico Malatesta Reader: 'The Method of Freedom'. The book includes not only some of Malatesta's longer essays, such as "Anarchy" and "Our Program" but also some of his previously untranslated articles.

The book is produced as a stand-alone companion to AK Press' planned ten-volume publication of Malatesta's Complete Works.



Banned during the fascist period in Chile—and still banned in the USA (Disney will sue anyone who publishes it), 'How to Read Donald Duck' is described by the authors as a decolonisation manual'. It is an analysis of the Disney comics and the conservative and reactionary values espoused in the comics.

Ever since 1935, when the League of Nations recognised Mickey Mouse as an International Symbol of Good Will”, Disney has been an outspoken political figure,and one who has always been able to count upon government help.” -Page 20

Originally published in 1918, Sen Katayama's 'The Labor Movement in Japan' documents Japan's dynamic labor struggles and radical political movements in the early 20th century. This updated edition features two additional writings by the author and a new introductory essay that further illuminates the experiences and activities of Japanese working people in action, as well as the lives of other radical actors who helped shape this movement into one of the twentieth century's most fascinating moments of class conflict and revolutionary confrontation.

Friday, July 18, 2014

AARGH #1 Online

The first edition of AARGH can be downloaded here.

Monday, June 2, 2014

AARGH! out now

Welcome to the first issue of aargh! (the Aotearoa Anarchist Review and Golfing Handbook*), an anarchist magazine published by the Freedom Shop Collective of Wellington, Aotearoa New Zealand. The title of the magazine, aargh! also reflects the way many of us feel about the world a fair amount of the time.


16 pages of radical anaylsis and commentary for only $2, available at the Freedom Shop now. If you can't make it to the shop, send us an envelope addressed to yourself and with an appropriate stamp and we'll mail you one. Send us ten dollars and we'll send five copies for you to give to your friends and family, who are bound to be delighted.

Contents
  • A sad, flippant kind of nihilism
  • GE - Myths, promises, missing miracles
  • Myopia - some thoughts on privacy and surveillance
  • What “Sovereign Borders” really look like
  • Indifference as a moral option?
  • Bureaucracy – taking the ‘demos’ out of democracy
  • Workers of the world: relax
  • Black Bean Chilli with Cornbread


*Disclaimer: We reserve the right to change our minds about what aargh! stands for.

Monday, April 7, 2014

Film Screening - 'Sedition' - 24 April

Sedition: The Suppression of Dissent in World War II New Zealand

Introduced by producer/director Russell Campbell.

The People's Cinema / Thursday 24 April, 6.30pm

After the carnage of World War I many New Zealanders formed a movement committed to rejecting war as a means of settling international disputes. When World War II broke out, government and pacifists were on a collision course; and Communists, too. There was active opposition to New Zealand’s involvement in the war. The government would brook no dissent. Anti-war campaigners were fined and imprisoned, and eight hundred conscientious objectors were incarcerated in detention camps for the duration of the war. Sedition tells their story.

Biography: Dr Russell Campbell is an adjunct professor in film at Victoria University of Wellington and a documentary filmmaker with Vanguard Films. Among his films as director or co-director are 'Rebels in Retrospect' (about the Progressive Youth Movement of the Vietnam War era), 'Islands of the Empire' (on New Zealand's military relationship with the United States), and 'Wildcat' (the story of a struggle for democracy in the Timberworkers Union).


Details of the documentary:
Sedition
Vanguard Films
Producer/director/writer: Russell Campbell
Director of photography/sound recordist: Shane Loader
Editing: Russell Campbell, Shane Loader
Music: David Long, Steve Gallagher
Narrator: Carmel McGlone
140 minutes, Exempt
Winner: New Zealand Media Peace Awards, 2005


What: Sedition
Where: The People's Cinema
When: Thursday 24 April, 6.30pm

Friday, March 21, 2014

Anarchist Bookfair Wrap-up


The Bookfair has been and gone - and the Freedom Shop gained a lot of new people to add to our list of contacts. We also sold quite a few books and zines plus had some interesting conversations about anarchy and the state - questions and discussions by browsers at the Bookfair were as diverse as prison abolition, how to safely destroy CCTV cameras, what is imperialism and what is colonisation, the pros and cons of electoral politics, and why some people feel they need to get their relationship recognised by the state and marry. It was an interesting and long day!

But especially good news for the Freedom Shop is that we not only gained interesting contacts and sold a lot of books, but we also bought some. We ended up buying books from both PM Press and Jura Books so in the Shop now is new exciting stock, including 'How to Make Trouble and Influence People' - the second edition. The book covers a lot of Australia’s radical past with more than 500 tales of Indigenous resistance, convict revolts and escapes, picket line hijinks, student occupations, creative direct action, street art, media pranks, squatting, blockades, banner drops, guerilla theatre, and billboard liberation.
 "Covering a wide gamut of seditious political acts, from Indigenous guerrilla resistance to anti-uranium blockades and Critical Mass bike rides, [How to Make Trouble and Influence People] is informed by the commonly held belief on the Left that social progress does not emanate from the pronouncements of 'enlightened' politicians, but instead derives from grassroots resistance to inequality and discrimination… In learning about the deeds of rebels past, we are provided with a memory bank of ideas and tactics from which to draw. These tales and images also serve to remind us that political activity need not be a predictable and grim slog. As well-resourced as our opponents may be, they are vulnerable to the use of creativity, solidarity and humour. Indeed, these are often the only tools we have." - From the Introduction to How to Make Trouble and Influence People, by Iain McIntyre.
 And here's a sample of other new books: 




Michael Schmidt, author of 'Black Flame' and 'The Cartography of Revolutionary Anarchism' was also at the Bookfair and on the Sunday outlined the story behind his upcoming book 'Global Fire'. An interesting interview with Michael about the new book can be read at Anarchist Affinity.

We do have a few more copies of 'Black Flame' in the Shop but have sold out of 'The Cartography of Revolutionary Anarchism'.

Monday, March 17, 2014

Film Screening in Wellington - Rebellion (L’ordre et la Morale). France 2011

Rebellion, directed by Mathieu Kassovitz is a dramatisation of the events on the New Caledonian island of Ouvea in 1988 when pro-independence Kanak activists took a group of French gendarmes hostage.

Screening
Friday March 21st
6.30pm
The People's Cinema, Manners Street
(over the road from McDonald's), Wellington.

 This was a crucial event in the long Kanak struggle for independence from France. Rebellions in 1871 and 1917 were followed by increasing pro-independence activism from the late 1960s. In 1981 a Kanak trade union, the USTKE was formed, followed in 1984 by the FLNKS, a pro-independence federation. During the late '80s pro and anti-independence activity led to protests and armed clashes. Much grassroots organising took place amongst the indigenous Kanaks including the establishment of the grassroots school network, the Ecole Populaire Kanak.

The lack of reaction by the FLNKS leadership to the Ouvea hostage situation created a perception of the distancing of the leadership - the 'grande tetes' - from the grassroots, a feeling increased by the agreement of the leadership to the Matignon Agreement, which put off any decision on independence for ten years. Support for Kanak independence was a significant area of work for New Zealand activists in the '80s and early '90s. This film covers an important, and now mostly forgotten, piece of Pacific history.

The film is a dramatisation of the autobiographical account of the events by a commander of a French anti-terrorist unit sent to negotiate with the militants, only to discover the French state was intent on a military solution. The film shows how the state acts to turn political problems into military ones, where it is at its strongest. It is directed, produced, co-written, co-edited, and stars Mathieu Kassovitz (for good measure, he also led the crew's exercise routines), best remembered for his 1995 'anti-cop' film, La Haine.

Screening Friday March 21st at 6.30pm at The People's Cinema, Manners Street (over the road from McDonald's), Wellington.